stage 3. Description examples

CRSBI  writing General Description in site reports

 

Description:

For a church or other building (as opposed to a museum), the Description, which can be quite succinct, should locate the settlement within the county, and the building within its town or village.  It should then briefly describe the plan and form of the building (e.g. ‘cruciform’, ‘with an aisled nave’, ‘a nave with a single south aisle,’ etc), including its parts and their approximate date (e.g. ‘a 13thc chancel’, ‘a 15thc W tower’). It should identify the main building materials used and mention any post-medieval restorations that are relevant to the Romanesque sculpture at the site.  Finally, it must list the Romanesque features included in the site report. For example, as at St Mary, Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire:-

 

Shorter version: St Mary's is a large church whose tall 18thc spire dominates the small market town of Ross-on-Wye. It has an aisled nave with five-bay arcades, a west tower, a chancel and an outer S nave aisle of c.1510.  The entire church was rebuilt in the late-13thc and dedicated in 1316, reusing a good deal of earlier material, including the nave arcades, originally of c.1200. The trumpet-scallop corbels supporting the west end of each arcade are stylistically slightly earlier and are the only Romanesque features in the building.

 

 

[Longer version: optional] Ross-on-Wye is a small market town of some 10,100 inhabitants (2001) in SE Herefordshire, situated 11 miles SE of Hereford and 4 miles from the Gloucestershire border.  The river Wye runs on the western edge of the town, separating it from neighbouring Wilton and Bridstow. The spire of St Mary's dominates the town.  It is a large church with an aisled nave with five-bay arcades, a west tower with its tall spire and a chancel with a south organ room.  The nave aisles have doorways under porches, and alongside the S porch is the Markye Chapel, which forms an outer S nave aisle.  The entire church was rebuilt in the late-13thc, and dedicated in 1316, but reusing a good deal of earlier material.  This includes the nave arcades, originally of c.1200, although the trumpet-scallop corbels supporting the west end of each arcade are stylistically slightly earlier.  The spire was rebuilt in 1721 and repaired after it was struck by lightning in 1852.  The arcades were heightened in 1743, which accounts for the curious step halfway up the columns.  The only significant later addition is the Markye Chapel, added c.1510.  The only Romanesque features are the west corbels of the nave arcades.

 

 

Ground plans are not necessary for buildings where the Romanesque features are within or attached to a later building, as, for example, where the only Romanesque feature is a font or a piece of sculpture attached to a later wall, tower etc.